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Commonly celebrated for its rich blue variety, sapphires have been treasured for thousands for years. The birthstone for September, the gemstones originally called "sapphire" were most likely what we know as lapis lazuli today. What we today refer to as sapphire was originally called hyacinth do to its similarity to the color of blue hyacinths. We now recognize that sapphire is much more than this one hue.

Called the "celestial gemstone," sapphire comes in all hues, from midnight blue, bright blue, rich gold, and fiery orange-red. The only shade that sapphire does not come in is red as this is shade classified as a separate gemstone, ruby. The only difference between a ruby and a sapphire is only a ruby can be red.

Though it is found throughout the world, the historic sources of sapphires are Sri Lanka and Burma and these islands still produce some of the highest quality gems in the world.